New Horizons in Medical Anthropology: Essays in Honour of Charles Leslie (Theory and Practice in Medicalanthropology)

December 22, 2008 | Comments Off on New Horizons in Medical Anthropology: Essays in Honour of Charles Leslie (Theory and Practice in Medicalanthropology)

New Horizons in Medical Anthropology is a cutting edge volume in honor of Charles Leslie, a highly respected medical anthropologist whose influential career has shaped this branch of anthropology as it is studied and theorized today. Written by former students and colleagues of Charles Leslie, this collection of papers deals with issues as diverse as AIDS and new medical technologies, therapy management and overpopulation, with case studies from Africa and Asia.

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Good Practice Teacher’s Book: Communication Skills in English for the Medical Practitioner (Cambridge Exams Publishing)

December 20, 2008 | Comments Off on Good Practice Teacher’s Book: Communication Skills in English for the Medical Practitioner (Cambridge Exams Publishing)

Good Practice is a course for doctors and medical students who need to communicate with patients in English, and can be used in the classroom or for self-study.

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Performance and Practices of Successful Medical Groups: 2007 Report Based on 2006 Data

December 19, 2008 | Comments Off on Performance and Practices of Successful Medical Groups: 2007 Report Based on 2006 Data


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Medical Response to Terrorism: Preparedness and Clinical Practice

December 18, 2008 | Comments Off on Medical Response to Terrorism: Preparedness and Clinical Practice

This comprehensive reference provides all the information emergency departments and personnel need to prepare for and respond to terrorist events. The first section covers all agents potentially used in terrorist attacks–chemical, biologic, toxicologic, nuclear, and explosive–in a systematic format that includes background, triage, decontamination, signs and symptoms, medical management, personnel protection, and guidelines for notifying public health networks. Algorithms show when to suspect and how to recognize exposure and detail signs and symptoms and management protocols. The second section focuses on all-hazards preparedness for hospitals, communities, emergency medical services, and the media, and includes an important chapter on simulation of disasters.

Customer Review: medical response to terrorism

The Medical Response to Terrorism Textbook is EXCELLENT – I have really enjoyed reading it (and I HATE reading textbooks). Each chapter is up to date, focused, and written in a manner more reminiscent of a novel than a medical textbook. Limiting the number of pages per chapter really forced the authors to be concise and made each topic more inviting to read. Great stuff – Dr. Keyes, et al should be very proud.

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Compliance Guide for the Medical Practice: How to Attain And Maintain a Compliant Medical Practice

December 18, 2008 | Comments Off on Compliance Guide for the Medical Practice: How to Attain And Maintain a Compliant Medical Practice

This new resource explains if government regulations apply to your practice, how to accomplish tasks related to compliance and how to change the culture so compliance is expected. Contains extensive information and instructions on creating a compliance program to help safeguard your practice from risk, both legal and financial. Topics include billing and reimbursement compliance, personnel policies, OSHA, CLIA and HIPAA. Checklists help the practice evaluate its level of compliance in particular areas, and practical guidelines are provided to train staff to develop, implement and maintain compliance programs within the practice.

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Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines, 2nd

December 16, 2008 | Comments Off on Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines, 2nd

The practice guidelines are the official statement of the Wilderness Medical Society on the best methods of handling wilderness related trauma, illness, or environmental injury. This peer reviewed work has 31 contributors and has been reviewed by two panels of the society consisting of an additional 14 physicians. The practice guidelines discuss treatment goals for 24 basic subjects. This publication also includes the Wilderness Pre-hospital Emergency Care Curriculum suggested by the Wilderness Medical Society for inclusion in the instruction of Wilderness Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT-W). This book is a must for anyone dealing with emergency planning, first aid procedures, or care of persons heading into remote areas for sport or employment. Learn the latest techniques approved and recommended by the Wilderness Medical Society.

Customer Review: wilderness medical society practice guidelines

The information on each topic was well organized and levels of care were discussed. I also liked the fact that when there was a difference of opinion concerning treatments each was discussed. There were no illustrations and the book is not a text for teaching wilderness medical care. Even as a trained First Responder I found some of the discussions were very tecnical and called for knowledge beyond the training of most outdoorsmen. It is not a guide for the beginner but rather for those with advanced first aid or medical training.

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Strange Bedfellows: How Medical Jurisprudence has Influenced Medical Ethics and Medical Practice

December 15, 2008 | Comments Off on Strange Bedfellows: How Medical Jurisprudence has Influenced Medical Ethics and Medical Practice

The relationship between law and bioethics and the influence of both on medical research and clinical practice is a topic that is often mentioned but rarely subjected to sustained critical analysis. This book considers a number of issues in medicine in which the influence of the law has been most profound and positive including:

  • informed consent;
  • advance directives;
  • constitutional liberties and privacy;
  • standards for pain management and end-of-life care.

The book provides important background material on significant legal and philosophical concepts, terms and principle necessary to an understanding of the legal process and ethical analysis. This work establishes the role of law in medicine and bioethics as being positive and its continuing involvement in the rights of research subjects and patients as a necessity.

Customer Review: Most Biased Textbook I Have Ever Read–Skip It!

This is the worst, most biased textbook I have ever read. I have been in college for 15 years and have taught 10 college courses. I am presently working on my 6th degree, a doctorate in philosophy and also have a law degree. I have seen lots of school and been around lots of books. I have never been more frustrated with an author’s lack of intellectual honesty. As I see it, intellectual honesty means either 1) being as unbiased as possible, or 2) giving the whole story. Rich does neither. I will give you several examples of this.

In the discussions on abortion, after repeatedly giving only one side to the history of abortion, Rich says this: “The Catholic Church’s growing militancy in defense of existing abortion laws in the United States” caused a new debate, and they joined forces with the National Right to Life Committee where “the two groups fought against the growing support for abortion with lurid and graphic images of aborted fetuses, a tactic that continues to characterize the so-called pro-life movement” (108). You gotta be kidding!! This is a textbook? This is more biased than most editorials I have read. On 111, he is describing the history of the abortion laws up to the Casey decision and comments on the “confirmation of the ultra-conservative justice, Clarence Thomas…” Again, a textbook saying this? When discussing the “right to die” cases on p.133, Rich again uses several adjectives to distort the facts. He talks about the Missouri court taking a “highly-controversial” step of second-guessing the trial court’s assessment of the facts. (I don’t know what planet he is on. Appellate courts do this all the time. Maybe they shouldn’t, but they do. I worked in a Superior Court for 3 years and saw it repeatedly.) Then, he says that the Missouri court’s ruling is “profoundly disturbing.” When he gets to the Cruzan case at the United States Supreme Court (p.134), he spends roughly 1/5 the time on the majority opinion (the one that is the law of the land) compared to the dissents. These are dissents that are “strong.” Frankly, I read them and thought that they were not well written, as whole. Earlier in the chapter, when he addressed doctors who force-fed a patient, he vilifies them and in no way respects their attempts to determine what is right: “Regrettably, however, as we have already seen in other cases, the core ethical value and legal principle underlying these ringing assertions–respect for the autonomy of the individual–continued to be compromised through an open and notorious collaboration of paternalistic physicians and patronizing judges” (130). Can you believe that? This is a textbook and he is addressing a case involving people struggling to do their best in a very difficult situation, and because they disagree with them, they are “notorious” and “patronizing.” Finally, he takes a shot at the whole state of Missouri: “If states such as Missouri are so determined to demonstrate their reverence for the sanctity of all human life, why have they not instituted measures that would trigger their involvement in each and every attempt on the part of a patient or surrogate to prevent the administration of life sustaining measures? The cynical answer…is that the elected officials are unwilling to expend the significant political (not to mention economic) capital that would be required to insinuate the state into life and death decision-making across the board. They will simply accept what role the state can secure through the offices of non-elected appellate judges” (p.136). Can you believe this garbage is in a textbook?

I hope that these quotations are sufficient to make my point. There are *several* other such shameful characterizations in the book. Lastly, I want to note that the book is sloppy in a couple places. In one place (I forgot to write down the page), he uses “loathe” when he means “loath.” And on p.136 he talks of Justices “Brennan and Stephens.” There is no Justice “Stephens” on the Supreme Court. It is John Paul “Stevens.” These little things indicate the manner in which this book is written.

I gave it two stars because it is well written in certain areas–such as his discussion of SUPPORT and other informed consent issues. That, however, cannot overcome the overall unfair presentation of the issues.

If your class is using this book and the teacher is forcing you to get it, go to the library. Don’t waste your money on the $70. If you do buy it, go sell it afterwards and get hold of Jerry Menikoff’s excellent “Law and Bioethics: An Introduction” http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0878408398/qid=1099190687/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-1375804-2934569?v=glance&s=books
or Roger Dworkin’s Book “Limits:The Role of the Law in Bioethical Decision Making.” http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0253330750/qid=1099190629/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-1375804-2934569?v=glance&s=books


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Integrated Behavioral Healthcare: Positioning Mental Health Practice with Medical/Surgical Practice (Practical Resources for the Mental Health Professional)

December 14, 2008 | Comments Off on Integrated Behavioral Healthcare: Positioning Mental Health Practice with Medical/Surgical Practice (Practical Resources for the Mental Health Professional)

Healthcare is now practiced in a different financial and delivery system than it was two decades ago. Currently managed care defines what is treated, how, by whom and for what reimbursement. Mental health professionals have been greatly impacted by these changes to their practice, and yet, there is little understanding of exactly what it is and where it is going. The present volume explores these issues, prospects and opportunities from the vantage of mental health /medical professionals and managed care executives who are in the very process of implementing changes to the existing system of managed care. Behavioral healthcare will be integrated into medical practice in the future for sound clinical and economic reasons. The present volume, edited by four prominent mental health professionals provides a roadmap of the emerging directions integrated behavioral healthcare is taking and lays out the steps the mental health professional needs to take–in training, and modifying her/his clinical practice–to adapt to the new system of healthcare.

Key Features
* Leading Experts in managed care
* Nicholas Cummings, Father of behavioral managed care
* Multidisciplinary approach

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Physicians, Surgeons and Apothecaries: Medical Practice in Seventeenth-Century Edinburgh (Scottish Historical Review Monograph series)

December 13, 2008 | Comments Off on Physicians, Surgeons and Apothecaries: Medical Practice in Seventeenth-Century Edinburgh (Scottish Historical Review Monograph series)


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The Practice of Concern: Ritual, Well-Being, and Aging in Rural Japan (Carolina Academic Press Ethnographic Studies in Medical Anth) (Carolina Academic Press Ethnographic Studies in Medical Anth)

December 12, 2008 | Comments Off on The Practice of Concern: Ritual, Well-Being, and Aging in Rural Japan (Carolina Academic Press Ethnographic Studies in Medical Anth) (Carolina Academic Press Ethnographic Studies in Medical Anth)

The Practice of Concern: Ritual, Well-Being, and Aging in Rural Japan explores ideas and practices related to religious ritual and health among older people in northern Japan. Drawing on more than three years of ethnographic fieldwork, Traphagan considers various forms of ritual performance and contextualizes these in terms of private and public spheres of activity. An important theme of the book is that for Japanese the expression of concern about family, friends, the community, and the nation is a central symbolic element in religious ritual practice. The book has important implications for research into religion and health, because it suggests that, in order to carry out successful cross-cultural research, it is necessary to move beyond conceptualizations of religion — largely centering on concepts of belief, faith, forgiveness — that have shaped much of the work in this area to date, because, as consideration of the Japanese context shows, the theological language of Western religions is not necessarily adequate to the task of understanding how health and religion are tied together in other cultures. Traphagan argues that there is a need to focus on how religious rituals are markers that symbolically convey information about embodied experience and how these markers express and are expressions of concerns about health and well-being. The Practice of Concern provides a detailed examination of Japanese religious practices both within the home and in the community, as well as a thorough discussion of Japanese concepts of health, well-being, and aging.

In addition to those who are interested in medical anthropology, this book will be useful to gerontologists who are concerned with cross-cultural studies in aging. Because of the rich ethnographic detail presented, the book also provides an excellent introduction to Japanese religious and ritual practice and Japanese culture and society more broadly.

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